A finished object or three…

Friday’s little thing last week (which should probably more properly be called Thursday‘s little thing) was a rather odd lump of something-or-other that, if truth be known, I am extremely pleased with. It turned out just right, you see, and relatively on time.

Friday, I acquired a new nephew. At 6 pounds and a bit, he is a tiny wee boy. Lucky me got to meet him within just a few hours of his birth and oh! what a treat it is to hold a truly new little man in your arms!

Of course he needed a little Auntie love in the form of a handmade blanket, so he got this:

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It is a simple chevron baby blanket, and the pattern couldn’t be simpler — so I have included it below.  That said, I am not a pattern designer, so you may have to do a little “interpreting” to figure this out. Please do let me know if there is something that is awkwardly phrased and I will try to explain it better.

It was so much fun to see my new nephew wrapped in his very first made-with-love blanket within just a couple of hours of his birth. But what, you may be asking yourself, does that have to do with Friday’s (Thurday’s) odd little round lump of a mystery object?

Well, my nephew has a sister. An older sister who at 5 years old is bouncy and happy and full of energy and oh-so-eager to have a new sibling. Too eager, perhaps, in the over-enthusiastic-and-not-always-gentle way that bouncy little girls can be when they really, really want to help Mama change a diaper or rock a baby or sing a lullaby at the top of their lungs. So while her brother gets a blanket, she gets this:

finisheddoll

It’s a Waldorf-style doll, made of natural cotton “skin” and stuffed largely with wool roving. The wool interior means that he has a heavy head, just like a real baby, and as you carry him around, he will soak up some of your body heat and radiate it right back at you, making him warm to the touch.

woolroving

His pants are a scrap of linen I had lying around, and his shirt is cotton, and his hair is a crocheted cap of curly merino wool.

dollhead

And best of all, he comes with a small diaper for those essential diaper changes, and a miniature chevron colour block blanket of his own.

dollblanket

So without further ado, here is the pattern for an almost-matching pair of chevron colour block blankets, one for baby, and one for a doll. Happy crocheting!

Chevron Colour Block Baby Blanket

Materials:
1 ball each of 4 colours you like in a soft worsted-weight yarn.

CAST ON: With first colour and a 4.5 mm crochet hook, make a chain of 113 stitches.

DECREASE STITCH: Yarn over and insert your hook in the next stitch. Pull up a loop. Yarn over and go through the first 2 loops on the hook. Yarn over and insert your hook into the next stitch. Pull up a loop. Yarn over and go through the first 2 loops on the hook. Yarn over and go through the remaining loops on the hook. The end result is a triangular-looking decrease stitch.

ROW 1: DC in the 4th chain from hook, counts as first 2 DC stitches. DC in the next 8 chains. *Chain 3. DC in next 10 chains. Skip next 3 chains and DC in next 10 chains. Repeat from * to end of row. Chain 3 and turn; this counts as first DC. The chain should be starting to take on the chevron shaping with the points of the triangle rising at each chain 3 and the valleys happening where you skipped 3 chains.

ROW 2: DC in each DC until you reach the chain 3 space. DC in the chain 3 space, chain 3, DC in the chain 3 space. DC in the next 8 DCs. Decrease the next 2 stitches together (1 decrease). Decrease the next two stitches after that together (1 decrease). The decreases should line up nicely with the skipped chain stitches from row 1, helping shape the fabric into a V. DC in the next 8 stitches, which should bring you to the next chain 3 space. Repeat like this across the blanket until 3 stitches before the end. Begin a decrease in the 3rd stitch from the end, but instead of decreasing into the next stitch, decrease into the space between the last 2 stitches, effectively decreasing 3 stitches into 1 stitch.

Repeat row 2 until you do not have enough yarn of the first colour to finish a new row. Change to the next colour and continue working rows in the row 2 pattern. Repeat with each colour until you have a finished blanket with 4 blocks of colour. Bind off securely and sew in all your tails.

Chevron Colour Block Doll Blanket

Materials:

About 1/4 of a ball each of soft worsted-weight yarn in 4 colours you like.

CAST ON: With the first colour and a 4.5 mm crochet hook, make a chain in a multiple of 16 stitches to get the width of blanket suitable for the doll you are making it for. For the doll blanket above, I did 4 repeats, so 64 stitches.

ROW 1: DC in the 4th chain from the hook; counts as the first 2 DC stitches. DC in the next 3 chains. *Chain 3. DC in next 10 chains. Skip next 3 chains and DC in next 10 chains. Repeat from * to end of row. Chain 3 and turn; this counts as first DC. The chain should be starting to take on the chevron shaping with the points of the triangle rising at each chain 3 and the valleys happening where you skipped 3 chains.

ROW 2: DC in each DC until you reach the chain 3 space. DC in the chain 3 space, chain 3, DC in the chain 3 space. DC in the next 3 DCs. Decrease the next 2 stitches together (1 decrease). Decrease the next two stitches after that together (1 decrease). The decreases should line up nicely with the skipped chain stitches from row 1, helping shape the fabric into a V. DC in the next 3 stitches, which should bring you to the next chain 3 space. Repeat like this across the blanket until 3 stitches before the end. Begin a decrease in the 3rd stitch from the end, but instead of decreasing into the next stitch, decrease into the space between the last 2 stitches, effectively decreasing 3 stitches into 1 stitch.

(Basically this is the identical pattern as above but worked over sets of 5 stitches instead of 10 stitches.)

Repeat row 2 four more times for a total of 5 rows of the first colour. Change to the next colour and continue working rows in the row 2 pattern. Repeat with each colour until you have a finished blanket with 4 blocks of colour. Bind off securely and sew in all your tails.

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